Featured Projects The Eight Auspicious Symbols - Tibetan Artworks, Tibetan Jewelry & Tibetan Ornaments

The eight auspicious symbols of Tibetan Buddhism consist of: a parasol, a pair of fishes, a treasure vase, a lotus, a white-spiraling conch shell, an endless knot, a victory banner, and a golden wheel.

Groupings of eight auspicious symbols were originally used in India at ceremonies such as an investiture or coronation of a king. An early grouping of symbols included: a throne, a swastika, a handprint, a hooked knot, a vase of jewels, a water libation flask, a pair of fishes, and a lidded bowl.
In Buddhism, these eight symbols of good fortune represent the offerings made by the gods to Shakyamuni Buddha immediately after he gained enlightenment. The following expounds upon these symbols.

The Parasol (umbrella): This was a traditional Indian symbol of protection and royalty. The parasol denoted wealth and status - the more included in a person's entourage, the more influential the person was, with 13 parasols defining the status of king.

Indian Buddhists who saw the Buddha as the universal monarch adopted this concept. Besides, 13 stacked parasols form the conical spire of the Buddha or Tathágata stupa. In Buddhist mythology, the king of the nagas (serpent-like creatures) gave a jeweled umbrella to the Buddha.

Symbolically, the protection provided by the parasol is from the heat of suffering, desire, obstacles, illness, and harmful forces.

A typical Tibetan parasol consists of a thin round wooden frame with 8, 16, or 32 thinly arched wooden spokes. Through its center passes a long wooden axle-pole embellished at the top with a metal lotus, a vase, and the triple jewel. White, yellow, or multicolored silk stretches over the domed frame and a folded or pleated silk skirt with 8 or 16 hanging silk pendants attached hang from the circular frame. The parasol dome represents wisdom and the hanging skirt, compassion.

The Two Golden Fishes: The two fishes originally represented the two main sacred rivers of India - the Ganges and the Yamuna. These rivers are associated with the lunar and solar channels that originate in the nostrils and carry the alternating rhythms of breath or prana (life-sustaining force).

Fish have religious significance in Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist traditions as well as in Christianity (the sign of the fish, the feeding of the five thousand). In Buddhism, the fish symbolize happiness as they have complete freedom of movement in the water. They represent fertility and abundance. They are often drawn in the form of carp, which are regarded in Asia as sacred on account of their elegant beauty, size, and lifespan.

The Treasure Vase: This is known as "the vase of inexhaustible treasures" - however much is removed from it, the vase remains perpetually full. In Southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, wealth vases sealed with precious and sacred substances are commonly placed upon altars and on mountain passes, or buried in water springs. The symbol is often shown as a highly ornate, traditional-shaped vase with a flaming jewel or jewels protruding from its mouth.
The Lotus Flower: The lotus blossoms unstained from the watery mire; it is a symbol of purity, renunciation, and divinity.

The Right-Spiraling Conch Shell: The conch shell is thought to have been the original horn-trumpet; ancient Indian mythical epics relate heroes carrying conch shells. The Indian god Vishnu is also described as having a conch shell as one of his main emblems; his shell bore the name Panchajanya, meaning, "having control over the five classes of beings."

The conch shell is an emblem of power, authority, and sovereignty; its blast is believed to banish evil spirits, avert natural disasters, and scare away poisonous creatures. In Indian culture, different types of conch shells were associated with the different castes and with male and female.

In Buddhism, the conch was adopted as a symbol of religious sovereignty and an emblem that fearlessly proclaimed the truth of the dharma. One of the 32 signs of a Buddha's body is his deep and resonant voice, which is artistically symbolized in images of the Buddha by three conch-like curving lines on his throat.

Shells that spiral to the right are very rare and considered especially sacred, the right spiral mirroring the motion of the sun, moon, planets, and stars across the sky. Also, the hair curls on a Buddha's head spiral to the right, as do his fine bodily hairs, the long white curl between his eyebrows, and the conch-like swirl of his navel.

A shell is made into Tibetan ritual musical instruments by cutting off the end of its tip and furnishing it with a mouthpiece and an ornamental metal casing that extends from the shell's mouth.

The Endless Knot: This symbol was originally associated with Vishnu and represented his devotion to his consort Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and good fortune. It symbolizes the Buddha's endless wisdom and compassion. It also can represent continuity or dependent origination as the underlying basis of life.

The Victory Banner: This was traditionally carried in battle. Great warriors would often have banners with their own emblems, the banners being carried on the back of their chariots. Krishna (an incarnation of Vishnu) had a banner bearing the garuda bird (a bird deity).

In early Buddhism, the banner represented Buddha's victorious enlightenment with his overcoming the armies of Mara (hindrances and defilements). Legend says the banner was placed on the summit of Mt Meru, symbolizing Buddha's victory over the entire universe.

In Tibetan Buddhism, the banner represents eleven methods of overcoming Mara: the development of knowledge, wisdom, compassion, meditation, and ethical vows; taking refuge in the Buddha; abandoning false views; generating spiritual aspiration, skilful means, and selflessness; and the unity of the three samádhis of emptiness, formlessness, and desire-less-ness.

The Golden Wheel: The wheel is an ancient Indian symbol of creation, sovereignty, protection, and the sun. The six-spoke wheel was associated with Vishnu and was know as the Sudarshana Chakra. The wheel represents motion, continuity, and change, forever moving onwards like the circular wheel of the heavens.

Buddhism adopted the wheel as a symbol of the Buddha's teachings and his first discourse at the Deer Park in Sarnath is known as "the first turning of the wheel of dharma." In Tibetan Buddhism, it is understood as "the wheel of transformation" or spiritual change.

The hub of the wheel symbolizes moral discipline, and the eight spokes represent analytical insight via rim-meditative concentration. The eight spokes point to the eight directions and symbolize the Buddha's Noble Eightfold Path: right understanding, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, mindfulness, and concentration.


Tibet Artwork, Tibetan Silver Jewelry , Tibetan Jewelry, Tibet Jewelry, Jewelry from Tibet, Tibetan Buddhist Jewelry, Tibetan Turquoise Jewelry, Tibetan Jewelery

Tibet Artwork, Tibetan Silver Jewelry , Tibetan Jewelry, Tibet Jewelry, Jewelry from Tibet, Tibetan Buddhist Jewelry, Tibetan Turquoise Jewelry, Tibetan Jewelery

Conch Shell (dun) - used in Buddhist worship as a trumpet or offertory vessel and symbolizes the spoken word of Buddha.

Vase (bum-pa) - used as the storage urn of a sacred receptacle and thus symbolizes hidden treasures.

Umbrella (gdugs) - a token of loyalty and symbolizes the protection of the Dharma (faith).

Endless Knot (apal-be) - an auspicious geometric diagram, it symbolizes devotion.

Dharma Wheel (chakra) - represents the unity of all things and symbolizes Sakyamuni himself.

Golden Fish (gser-na) - as water allows fish to swim freely, so Buddhist belief emancipates the soul. They symbolize spiritual liberation.

Lotus flower (padma) - as the flower rises from muddy roots, so Nirvana arises from this shabby world; therefore it symbolizes purity.

Banner of Victory (dpal-be) - a unique Buddhist object, the cylindrical layered banner symbolizes victory over ignorance and death.

This Tibetan Stirling Silver Bracelet is handcrafted by the Tibetan Craftsmen from stirling silver, and engraved with the Baobao symbols - the eight auspicious symbols. This Unique Stirling Silver Bracelet is perfect for Men! The Real Bracelet is More beautiful than the Picture. The size of this silver bracelet is width: 3.2cm, diameter: 6cm. Buy this babao bracelet
 

Featured Handmade Tibetan Jewelry

The most precious & widely used gemstones in Tibetan artworks & Tibetan jewelry - turquoise & coral. Coral is known to be used as a gem since prehistoric times. Has a history of religious meaning and is one of the seven treasures in Buddhist scriptures. Turquoise is one of the world's earliest-used gem materials. Ranked with the jades of the Orient and lapis in the Near East, turquoise has been revered for thousands of years. Coral was long thought to be a strong talisman against bleeding, evil spirits, and hurricanes.
tibetan necklace
This Handmade Tibetan Double Stone Stirling Silver Necklace is handcrafted by the Tibetan Craftsmen from stirling silver and top-grade natural turquoise and red coral.
tibetan pendant
This Handmade Tibetan Buddha Eye Pendant was made in Nepal from stirling silver & turquoise. Buddha eye is the Nepali character for the number 1, which symbolizes unity of all the things as well as the one way to reach enlightenment—through the Buddha's teachings. Above this is a third eye, symbolizing the all-seeing wisdom of the Buddha.
tibetan necklace
This Handmade Tibetan Necklace was made in Nepal from Turquoise, Red Coral, Lapis Lazuli & Stirling Silver. Very Charming Tibet Necklace.
tibetan ring
Om Mani Padme Hum can not really be translated into a simple phrase or even a few sentences. By pray the OM Mantra words, all of the Dharma is based on Buddha's discovery that suffering is unnecessary: Like a disease, once we really face the fact that suffering exists, we can look more deeply and discover it's cause; and when we discover that the cause is dependent on certain conditions, we can explore the possibility of removing those conditions.
tibetan earrings
This pair of Tibetan Earring was handmade in Tibet from sterling silver and Turquoise
tibetan gau box
One of the most stunning pieces of Tibetan jewelry is the famed Ghau pendant. Also called a prayer box pendant, this jewelry piece often features rare and unusual gemstones and incredible carved silverworks. In Buddhism, the Ghau is actually a portable shrine that holds an image wrapped in silk that represents the owner's personal deity. Some Ghaus have a small opening allow you to see the personality deity.
buddha statue
Tibetan Buddha Statues come in the shape of every possible Buddhist deity. In general, Buddhism is a practice of finding peace within oneself. Tibetan Buddhism is practiced by people who live in Tibetan, and there are some practices that are unique to Tibetan Buddhism.
singing bowl
In Buddhist practice, singing bowls are used as a support for meditation, trance induction and prayer. For example, Chinese Buddhists use the singing bowl to accompany the wooden fish during chanting, striking it when a particular phrase in a sutra, mantra or hymn is sung. In Japan and Vietnam, singing bowls are similarly used during chanting and may also mark the passage of time or signal a change in activity.
tibetan conch shell
The conch shell is an emblem of power, authority, and sovereignty; its blast is believed to banish evil spirits, avert natural disasters, and scare away poisonous creatures. In Indian culture, different types of conch shells were associated with the different castes and with male and female.
tibetan mask
This Tibetan Buddhist Mask - Sakyamuni was made in Tibet from copper.

People and Monks

People of Tibet - The Divinest of All! Tibet serves as a home to many communities like Menpa, Han, Chinese, Sherpa, Dengs and Luopa. The area is quite thinly populated with only 1.68 persons per sq. km on an average. The overall population of Tibet is around 260,0000. The ancestors of the present Tibetans lived on both sides of Tsangpo River and mainly earned their livelihood from cultivation of barely, wheat and peas. There is also nomadic population in Tibet that keeps moving from one place to other herding their yaks and sheep. But slowly more and more people are moving towards cities for better education and job.

Are Tibetans A Holy Lot?

You will witness a number of religions practice prevailing in the region as the majority of the population is the firm follower of Buddhism. People who follow Islam and Catholicism are present in large numbers, especially in Lhasa and Yanjing. Tibet has the largest number of monks in the world with almost 1/3 of the population being a monk. They are considered to be the ultimate followers of Buddhism. Even you will feel internally rejuvenated by finding the people so optimistic and so proud of their beliefs and religion. Tibetan is the main language that is spoken here. Although the accent and pronunciation varies from region to region but most of them belong to the Sino- Tibetan phylum. 

What is the Occupation of Tibetans!

Majority of the people are still confined to agriculture sector, but the number has been steadily declining. More and more people are getting educated and moving out into the cities for jobs in factories and government postings. Since most tourists more often travel only to the important destinations and leave, they miss out on a lot of local and unique stuff that is really worth visiting.

What Makes Tibitan Lifestyle!

What will strike you the most is the life style and nature of the people of Tibet. They all seem so happy and content in whatever way they live, they work, right from their homes, the dress they wear to the knife they carry, everything is so detailed and carefully chosen. Each community has its own traditional clothing for both men and women. One can easily distinguish the people from their clothing itself.

Want to Know More About The People of Tibet?

Tibet, you will learn how to be happy and live a life full of contentment without a complaint. Just pass a smile to a Tibetan who is looking at you and believe us you will get an even bigger smile in return. This is the way they are much warm, caring and full of hospitality towards their guests for whom they will go out of the way to help. To learn the simple courtesies of life and to acclimatize moral values there is no other place better than Tibet where one can learn the best of it. They seem like a new breed of humans, happy the way they are, totally unperturbed by outside world. Come to Tibet and get to know these wonderful people, from whom we can still learn a lot about life.
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Arts and Crafts of Tibet

Looking For Arts and Cafts of Tibet ! Tibetan art and craft is one of the virtues of the town that can be traced in its most original form, not been influenced even a bit by the western styles and traditions. And the people of Tibet are proud of their this cultural heritage. Whatever be the field, painting, music, crafts, Tibet has its own identity, its own charm.

What are the Famous Art Form of Tibet !

People of Tibet consider paintings as strong medium for spreading their knowledge and religion to all possible parts of the world. Most of the paintings portray an unshakable belief of people in Buddhism and the way they lead their life. Most of the paintings in Tibet are frescoes, cliff paintings, Thangka and wood-prints. You will see most of the cliff paintings on huge rocks and what you will find most astonishing will be the close resemblance of these paintings to mid- Asian cliff paintings. Probably, this is because the cliff painting in Tibet is prevalent from pre historic times. Even the frescoes that you will see on the walls of temples, monasteries and palaces are close to the ones that are found in India. 

Is Tibet Famous For Its Handicraft Items !

Handicraft works in Tibet are quite unique and rare and their specializations are also quite incomparable. Sharp knives, as a handicraft product, are quite flattering. They are in-fact very beautiful to look at and the shape, decorations and attention given to the minutest of detail, will without a doubt leave you spellbound and definitely increases the temptation to possess one. Though you cannot carry a knife on a flight but you can definitely send them by post to your living place. So when you reach home, expect a shiny and sharp gift from Tibet, waiting for you.

Silver ornaments are also very famous in Tibet. These are worn by almost every citizen of Tibet. These ornaments are studded with different prestigious stones that also are considered to be a symbol of health and good luck. You would not like to leave Tibet without one for yourself as they are exceptionally elegant and classy in looks. Other things that should be part of your shopping list in Tibet are Tibetan carpets, masks and rugs.

Do Painted Structure Symbolize Tibet Art !

Painting of the structure in Tibet also form a major part in the showcasing the rich art skills. It is sure that the moment you enter a Tibet city, first thing that catches your eyes will be the intricate use of colors on the walls and roofs of temples, monasteries as well as houses. People here believe that colors have a language of their own and can communicate a feeling very easily. The best example of this is the Potala Palace. The red and white colors used in the building symbolizes power and peace respectively. Apart from the use of colors, even the structure of these buildings is unique.

Want to Know More About Tibet Art and Craft !

Tibet is a place where you will find art in almost all aspects of life of people. Be it the decorations in their homes, the clothes they wear or even the knife they carry with themselves should be artistic. You can find all these items to buy on the Barkhor Street which is the biggest market in Tibet. So from the time you land in Tibet, look out for some of the most stunning works of crafts and do catch the most unique form of art in the paintings, handicrafts and architecture of Tibet.

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